Category Archives for "Bus Life"

Bus Build: Adding Floor Insulation to our Bus Conversion – S03E02

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle

Our bus won't start, NO!!!! Well, something has drained the batteries, so while we wait for them to charge up we carry on with work.

Before we can put our subfloors down we wanted to make sure we insulated the floors where possible.

We had kept some of the floor insulation that was in the back of the bus, near the engine.  We took it out, let it dry (as there was a leak around the restroom area), vacuumed it and put it back in.  It is a soft black rubbery foam sheet that we assume must have sound absorbing insulation as it was only used near the engine.  We had taken out fiberglass insulation in some areas plus there is the hollow air ducts from the air conditioning. We are not using the original aircon, so it seemed best to fill in these ducts with foam board insulation to prevent any air or moisture coming up into the floors and then seal the cracks and gaps with spray foam insulation.

In order to put our floorboards down we had to make a floor plan diagram and triple check our measurements before cutting the plywood.

The width of the inside of our bus is 8 foot 2 inches, a standard piece of plywood is 8 x 4 foot. That means we would not be able to add subfloor using just 8 x 4 plywood sheets across the width of the bus, but would have to cut several sheets measuring 2 foot 1 inch for the subfloor sides and an 8x4 down the middle of the bus (See our video for a diagram of this).

This was all made more difficult by the fact that we needed our subfloor boards to align with the bus floor frame to have something to screw the wood into.  So this required lots of measuring and cutting the boards to size.

 

Up Next
We get the center floorboards down, but not without trial and error.

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Spray Foam Insulation
​It forms a long-lasting, airtight, water-resistant seal. It helps keep insects, moisture/condensation and allergens out. Adheres to wood, metal, masonry, glass and most plastics.  We used these cans just

Bus Build: Prepping the Floorboards – S03E01

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle

With the Bus Demolition behind us it was time to start building and first up on the agenda was the floors.  

The original floorboards had a black rubbery layer underneath the plywood that covered the center boards over the pipes and near the engine. We assume it was some sort of fire retardant layer, but after researching and talking to auto part stores we came up with nothing. We thought it was probably a good idea to still have a layer of protection between the wood and the ground as some areas (where the pipes are) go straight down to the ground so a moisture barrier would help.

We ended up going with Plas-tex sheets which are waterproof and made from recycled plastic.  We glued the Plas-tex sheets to the underside of the plywood we were going to put down the center of the bus to cover the pipes.

For the rest of the plywood, that we would go down the sides of the bus, we just painted the underside with Kilz Latex Sealer  which is mold and moisture resistant.

We kept the original floor insulation from the back of the bus near the engine, there was a leak in the restroom area so we left those pieces out to dry and then vacuumed up any rust or pieces of fiberglass insulation that were stuck to them.  Then played tetris trying to put them back into their original positions between the metal frames.

There were still some gaps which we thought we would fill in with spray foam insulation so we did a test area as we heard it expands quite a bit.  It did expand quite a lot, so we decided to use it just to seal up any edges of the existing insulation.  Otherwise it would be too expensive to use these cans on the floor and a lot of extra work to cut back where it extended too far.

Our plan is to buy a 2 system spray foam insulation kit to insulate the ceiling to get the highest R Value we can, so these cans were just to seal in anything under the floor and get a feel for spray foam insulation and how it works.

 

Up Next
We figure out our measurements to cut the floorboards and lay them down.  First we wanted to start up the bus so we could open the luggage bays and empty them out, however the bus did not start.  Did we damage something during the demolition?

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Plas-tex
PLAS-TEX® panels are made of durable reinforced plastic. PLAS-TEX® is designed specifically for areas requiring moisture resistance, sanitization and toughness to withstand demanding environments. We chose to put the Plas-tex sheets on the plywood going over the areas that are open to the ground.

Kilz 2 Latex Sealer
KILZ 2 is a primer paint that has a mildew resistant film. Ideal for sealing porous interior and exterior surfaces. We used this on the plywood we are laying on the sides of the bus over the luggage bays.

Spray Foam Insulation
​It forms a long-lasting, airtight, water-resistant seal. It helps keep insects, moisture/condensation and allergens out. Adheres to wood, metal, masonry, glass and most plastics.  We used these cans just

Fact Check

R Value Comparison Chart - Great Day Improvements

Season 3: The Bus Build – Trailer

By Mela & Don | Adventure , Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle , Travel

We are ready to bring you Season 3 filled with adventure, travel and of course the bus build.

Season 3 Starts on 

January 29, 2020 on Patreon (for the Rehabi-Tribe)

February 5, 2020 on YouTube

 

Up Next
Episode one begins with a bang - romance, the beginning of the bus build and problems arise right from the get go.

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

The Rehabi-Tribe on Patreon

We are making some BIG changes - attempting a major lifestyle makeover and we are bringing you along on the journey.
We started our journey as a 2-car, 3-cat, big-city-dwelling couple with hopes and dreams of
  • Tiny House Living
  • Organic Farming
  • Earthship Adventures
  • Beekeeping
  • Travel
  • and passing on a planet with clean air and fresh water to the next generations.
We hope that by sharing our experiences we encourage others to try small changes and that collectively, all of our small changes will have a big impact.

Season 2: F.A.Q.

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Eco , Lifestyle , Travel

Thank you to all those who have joined us on our journey so far.  As we start moving into the build faze of our conversion we thought we'd dedicate an episode to answering the questions we get asked regularly across all platforms (youtube, facebook and instagram) and in person.

See links below for the episodes we are referring to in our answers.  If you haven't seen them yet go check them out!

Please feel free to comment below if you want to share ideas of where we should visit once we start traveling, or if you have suggestions of workshops/classes we could take along the way.  If you have any questions that we still haven't answered, let us know!

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

The Rehabi-Tribe on Patreon

We are making some BIG changes - attempting a major lifestyle makeover and we are bringing you along on the journey.

We started our journey as a 2-car, 3-cat, big-city-dwelling couple with hopes and dreams of
  • Tiny House Living
  • Organic Farming
  • Earthship Adventures
  • Beekeeping
  • Travel
  • and passing on a planet with clean air and fresh water to the next generations.
We hope that by sharing our experiences we encourage others to try small changes and that collectively, all of our small changes will have a big impact.

Trailer for Season 2

Many people have asked if Don composed all the music in our episodes.  There is just no time for him to do that, BUT he did compose the music for Rehabit8's theme music and this Trailer for Season 2.   For more info on Don's original compositions go to www.donbodin.com

Our Maiden Voyage

This was our first trip in our bus!  We had no running water and were roughing it just to get to the Midwest and begin our build. This is not the way we will be living in the bus in the future, but it sure was a fun trip.

We Bought a Bus

In this episode we show a little of our search for the perfect bus for us, and some not so perfect buses.

Bus Demolition Day 5: Things Get Stinky

The day we dreaded, taking out the toilet.  We discover our perfect bus did have some rust after all.

RV Trial Trip.........Can We Travel Full-Time

That time we tested out what it was like to live and travel full-time in an RV. See also Part 2 and Part 3 of the trip.

Saving Money While Saving the Planet

In our first season we shared the ways in which we had made changes in our lives to reduce our waste.  We plan to continue to make changes, improve our habits and share them with you. This episode was about the ways we saved money while being eco-conscious.  You can navigate through our site to find more episodes like this focusing on zero-waste and sustainable living by clicking on Posts in the menu tab, and then Eco.

Things We Wish We Knew Before the Bus Demolition

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle

We have finally completed the demolition of our 40 ft 1996 MCI D3 Coach Bus and are getting ready to begin the build to make our tiny home on wheels.  If you’ve been following along you will know that the demolition was a long and tiring job for us. We learnt a lot during this time and were met with a few surprises that we thought we’d share with you.

The Right Tools for the Job

These are not the only tools we used, but they are some tools we found essential and didn’t know we needed:

SHOPVAC - we used this almost daily, there was so much dust and debris and a regular vacuum would not be able to handle it.

THE MULTI-TOOL - super useful for various random tasks and I’m sure we’ll be using it more during the build

ANGLE GRINDER - Don’s favorite tool!  We used this for removing rust and taking out the seat rails.

HAMMER AND CHISEL - Some things just required a lot of brute force to pull apart and a good old hammer and chisel come in handy.

Stay Safe Wear Protection

The demolition is tough on your body, at the beginning of the process we didn’t think about the protection we would need until after we started a job.  We quickly learned that this is not the way to do it!

WEAR CLOTHES YOU DON’T MIND RUINING - this might seem like an obvious one, but there are some glues they use in the MCI bus that you will not get off your clothes or skin.  So cover up well!  

GLOVES - we went through a lot of gloves!

EAR PROTECTION - When using the angle grinder or even the hammer and chisel

EYE PROTECTION - We used both goggles and glasses depending on the job.  

MASKS - When you start pulling this apart it gets really dusty, you don’t want to be breathing it in.

RESPIRATORS - Once you start using chemicals like applying rustoleum you need to up your game from masks to respirators

KNEE PADS - We spent a lot of time on our knees while working on the floors.  We started out with cheap knee pads and they did more harm than good. It’s worth spending some money on these.  Your knees will thank you!

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE FOR YOUR BODY - We kept up a regular routine of Pilates, walking and massages.  It’s not that we didn’t hurt after being on our knees and leaning over for 5 hrs a day, but without this exercise and care routine I don't think we would have bounced back so quickly.

Plan for the Unexpected

Everything takes longer than you think. The weather can also dictate what you can and can’t do in a day, so you have to be ready to go with the flow.  You also just don’t know what you will find when you start pulling things apart. There was no visible rust on our bus, but we did find water damage and rust under our floors. Our theory is that it’s better to pull it apart now and find all the surprises during the demolition than have to deal with surprises later on down the line when you are living in the bus. 

We also did not realize how much time it would take to document this journey.  We love creating our blog and vlog, but it means that everything takes twice as long during our build process as we have to set up cameras and talk about what we are doing.  It’s really a full-time job creating these videos. Which is why we have started up a Patreon Page and formed the Rehabi-Tribe. We look forward to growing and engaging with our tribe because as much work as it is we LOVE doing it.

It Has Tested Our Relationship

We’ve seen TV shows of couples building their dream house and arguing due to the stress and finances.  Building a Tiny House is no different. As you get tired or frustrated you aren’t always your best self.  I can see how couples could break up due to the stress. For us it brought us closer together as we learnt to communicate better and work as a team.

It Costs More Than You Think

Everything costs more than you think and there are always things you’ve forgotten to budget for, or don’t know you need yet.  We haven’t even begun building out the bus yet and we have already spent 50% of our original budget. Where has that money gone?  Purchasing the bus, bus maintenance (like oil change and service), tools, protective gear, solar panels, lumber and miscellaneous hardware. We will probably spend 25-40% more than we originally planned.

Community Matters

The number of people who have reached out to help or offer advice has been amazing.  The bus/skoolie/rv community is very supportive and helpful. We welcome comments and tips you may have to help us along the way.  Likewise if you have any questions for us we will try to answer to the best of our ability. It’s nice to know we are not alone!

 

Up Next
We answer a few FAQ

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

The Rehabi-Tribe on Patreon

We are making some BIG changes - attempting a major lifestyle makeover and we are bringing you along on the journey.
We started our journey as a 2-car, 3-cat, big-city-dwelling couple with hopes and dreams of
  • Tiny House Living
  • Organic Farming
  • Earthship Adventures
  • Beekeeping
  • Travel
  • and passing on a planet with clean air and fresh water to the next generations.
We hope that by sharing our experiences we encourage others to try small changes and that collectively, all of our small changes will have a big impact.

ShopVac

This has been our "Hero" tool. With the bus as filthy as it is, we needed a work horse shop vac. The one we are using is an older version of this one here. 

Speed Oscillating Multi-Tool Kit

We've already found this helpful with other tasks, but removing glue from the metal frame is it's latest feat!  Just as the name says it has many uses and can be used for cutting, sawing, trimming, grinding and sanding. I'm sure we will be using it again in the future!

Bosch Angle Grinder

We have used 4 angle grinders already on this job! 2 cheapo's from Harbor Freight (one sadly died) and 1 Robi which was cordless and the battery only lasts for so long. The best angle grinder we have used is a Bosch brand. It seems to have much more power and fortitude than the others.

3M Ear Protectors, Hearing Protection,

These earmuffs have a noise reduction rating of 30dB and boy are we glad. After hitting metal on metal all day long you gotta have these so you don't go deaf! 

3M Respirator

This 3M Respirator provides 95% filter efficiency against solid and liquid aerosols as well as certain organic vapors, a must when applying the POR15 and Rustoleum application.

Bus Demolition Day 21: Bye Bye Black Bus

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle

While we loved the look of our black bus, the black color just heated up the bus way too quickly as we learned in our Glamping Trip. The black is actually a wrap not paint, so we just had to peel it off.  Our cousin was visiting for the day and kindly wanted to help with the bus work so we thought this would be a good job for all. And it was! It became a real family affair (Don’s parents joined the party too) and it was quite a change of pace from working inside the bus filled with chatting, laughter, fresh air and rocking out to our favorite tunes.

We’ve seen others use heat guns first before peeling it off, but with the mid-summer sun beating down on our black bus it peeled off without too much effort.  On the sides of the bus we were able to take it off in one long strip. It took two people, so 4 hands, but it was fairly easy and fast. Around the back and front end of the bus it required a little more diligence.  These parts came off one tiny bit at a time.  

Don and his dad got up on ladders to remove the wrap from the top. It did not cover the entire roof, just as much as could be seen from below.  This was a little scary because as you pulled on the wrap it would snap and rip off. You had to really put your weight into the pull so you can imagine how hair-raising it was every time it snapped. Luckily no one fell!

The front of the bus offered a different challenge. You could see where the logo was from the buses first owner.  They had removed the logo but not the adhesive, so it was extra sticky and ridiculously hard to get it off. We tried applying olive oil and baking soda onto it, even WD40 and various little tools and knives to scrape at it.  Nothing really worked except for a little pocket knife. We all had a go at this area, but the sun got the better of us. We tried to stay in the shade of the bus and moved around the bus as the sun did, but that front area (of course it would be the hardest) was in the sun all day.  

With sunburned faces and shoulders, we had to call it a day.  We came back the next day though and finished up that tricky logo area and any spots we happened to miss. The color underneath is almost similar to a school bus color, but a little more of a pukey brown than yellow - not very attractive. We’ll definitely be painting the bus a different color in the future.  The wrap did leave a sticky residue all over the bus which we will need to get off before painting. If anyone has any suggestions for removing this, please do let us know in the comments!

 

Up Next
We share with you the things we wish we had known before we started this bus demolition!

Bus Demolition Day 20: Floors? ✅. But that’s not the BIG NEWS

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle

We completed the job of spray painting rustoleum onto the floor to protect and seal all the metal under our soon to be wood floors.  We went through about 12 cans of spray paint in total. At a later point, we will do the same thing on the walls and ceiling. There is a lot less rust however to deal with in those areas. 

Working on this project has taken me (Mela) completely out of my element. I have never done anything remotely like this before and I would never have chosen to convert a bus if it wasn’t for Don.  I started the project with a positive attitude and was having a lot of fun, but the novelty of what we were doing wore off pretty quick and the demolition just felt like a chore I had to do which I was not enjoying.  Each job felt worse than the last and the harsh humid Midwest Summer plus a cough that lasted more than a month didn’t help my spirit.  

Regardless we pushed through and learned to overcome obstacles together. Our communication improved and thus so were we able to support each other better.  During this tough journey it has become very apparent to me that we have found a very special relationship here and that I am in the right place and with the right person.  No matter what challenges we face in the build, as we begin to travel and in whatever our future holds, we will face it together.

So the BIG NEWS is that I proposed to Don and he said YES!  We decided there was no time like the present and we were going to get married as soon as possible, setting the date for just 2 weeks time! Don tends to go 200% once he’s decided to do something and he immediately jumped to it and started planning our wedding.  

But wedding to plan or not, the bus is still in need of a lot of work.

 

Up Next
We say goodbye to the Black Bus.

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Rustoleum Primer Paint

We used this Rustoleum primer to coat our metal floor beams. It is a durable protective coating with excellent rust prevention to be used on metal only.  It provides a base for excellent adhesion and withstands demanding, heavy-use environments.  

POR15 Rust Stop Kit

Por15 provides permanent rust protection, but is best for small areas.  We used this on the areas that contained the worst rust, while painted the rest of the bus with rustoleum. 

3M Respirator

This 3M Respirator provides 95% filter efficiency against solid and liquid aerosols as well as certain organic vapors, a must when applying the POR15 and Rustoleum application.

Bus Demolition Day 19: Rust Prevention

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle

Our floor beams were clean and shiny so we were ready to paint them with Rustoleum - a rust preventive coating.  For the really bad areas that have a lot of pitting we applied POR15.

POR15 recommend you wear gloves and respirators and follow this 3 Step Process:

  1. Use a rag to clean the metal with the POR15 Cleaner and Degreaser 

  2. Apply the POR15 Metal Prep mixture with a rag. This actually scuffs up the metal, to help the sealant grip to the metal

  3. Apply the POR15 Rust Preventive Coating with a paintbrush

We have also seen other people use a steel brush to grind the area to help the sealant stick to the metal, so we tried this on one of the bad areas too to see what worked best. Don also tested on a small area what would happen if he didn’t do step one and two and just applied the coating to see if all that prep was really necessary.  It all worked great, as far as we can tell it worked just as well whether you prepped the metal first or not.

We bought a POR15 kit to test it first and see how it worked.  The kit only has a 4oz Can of the Preventive Coating (plus the cleaner and metal prep bottles) but you can buy larger cans (of the coating) up to a Gallon. 

Be very careful with this stuff, it does not come off your skin.  Don, unfortunately, found this out the hard way. It’s okay though, he just has to wait for about 6 weeks for the skin to naturally take it off.

The rest of the metal frame we painted with Rustoleum Spray Paint.  Make sure you use all your protective gear here too: gloves, respirator and eye goggles. We tore up some old boxes and  used them to cover parts we didn’t want to spray like hoses and the holes going down into the luggage bays.

Super hard work but we now know that we have done everything we can to prevent further rust from developing and will have a healthy, clean and strong tiny home to live in.

 

Up Next
With one simple question, everything changes for us.

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Rustoleum Primer Paint

We used this Rustoleum primer to coat our metal floor beams. It is a durable protective coating with excellent rust prevention to be used on metal only.  It provides a base for excellent adhesion and withstands demanding, heavy-use environments.  

POR15 Rust Stop Kit

Por15 provides permanent rust protection, but is best for small areas.  We used this on the areas that contained the worst rust, while painted the rest of the bus with rustoleum. 

3M Respirator

This 3M Respirator provides 95% filter efficiency against solid and liquid aerosols as well as certain organic vapors, a must when applying the POR15 and Rustoleum application.

Bus Demolition Day 18: Now We Understand What Burn Out Is

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle

Day 18 of demolition was our 6 year Anniversary as a couple, yet we were in the bus working hard on what was probably the sweatiest day yet. The temperature was in the 90’s (which means inside the bus it’s about 110 degrees Fahrenheit) with about 86 % humidity.

The metal frame was looking nice and shiny with the all the rust removed, all that was left to do was a final clean.  We vacuumed with our trusty ShopVac, and wiped it clean so it would be ready to paint.

Working on these floors has been the toughest part of the demolition.  We understand now why we have seen so many buses for sale that are only half converted (with just the floors in for example). People get burnt out and give up at this point.  But we will keep pushing through as we feel we have gotten over the hurdle and feel hopeful that things will get a little easier as we go.

Not only has it challenged us physically, but our relationship as a couple too. Our communication skills have had to improve, our patience and understanding of each other has grown.  We can see how couples can break up over a task like this, but for us it has actually brought us closer together.

 

Up Next
Next up we will coat the metal frame with Rustoleum and POR15.

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

ShopVac

This has been our "Hero" tool. With the bus as filthy as it is, we needed a work horse shop vac. The one we are using is an older version of this one here.

Bus Demolition Day 17: Rust Removal, No Problem!

By Mela & Don | Bus Conversion , Bus Life , DIY , Lifestyle

We thoroughly enjoyed our trip to LA but unfortunately I (Mela) caught a cold on the way back home.  So Don headed back into the bus solo so I could get some rest. We were so close to being done with these floors (we have been doing this for what feels like forever) so he tackled the last 10% without me and got the job done!

As you know we used Citristrip to get the glue off the floor.  It worked well but we made some mistakes along the way and thought we’d share some tips with you.

 FOR USING CITRISTRIP

1. Wear Protective gear.

Gloves, long-sleeved T-shirts, long pants, goggles etc.  You don’t want to get this on your skin, it burns!

2. Have a rag handy, to clean up the excess glue or drips

Clean it up quick before it starts eating through things you don’t want it to.

3. Be careful what you touch while working with it.

 Take your gloves off before touching anything you don’t want to get the citristrip on. We almost ruined our camera by touching it with our gloves.  Big oops!

4. Watch where you step.

The hard part about putting this on the floor frame in the bus is there was little place to stand.  So make a plan of where to start and finish your application so you won’t track it around.

Rust Removal

The next day Don’s dad assisted him in completing the rust removal.  We had done small areas in the past, one thing we learned was to take the safety guard off the angle grinder (link) because then we were able to put the grinder flat onto the metal.  It didn’t eat up the blade at the edges and sanded down the metal more evenly. We used a few different angle grinders, our favorite was the Bosch Angle Grinder as it was more powerful.  The cheaper ones we bought from Harbor Freight got the job done too but there was a big difference in power.

After the job was done we were pleased to see the main beams were in really good shape and shining up nicely. We realized the support beams at the back of the bus, that were completely  rusted out, were designed to support the restroom (which we took out). We don’t need these support beams so we just took them out.

 

Up Next

We both go back to working in the bus for what will be the hottest, sweatiest period of bus work yet.

 

Some of the links we share are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, Rehabit8 will earn a small commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that we have experience with all of the products we post and share them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions we make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you achieve your goals.

Bosch Angle Grinder

We have used 4 angle grinders already on this job! 2 cheapo's from Harbor Freight (one sadly died) and 1 Robi which was cordless and the battery only lasts for so long. The best angle grinder we have used is a Bosch brand. It seems to have much more power and fortitude than the others.

4 inch Gator Grit Paint and Rust Remover

This has an extra course grit, an attachment for an electric drill and did a great job at removing surface rust from our metal frame.

Citristrip

This stripping gel can be used on wood, metal and masonry surfaces.  We used it to remove the glue from the metal frame. There are no harsh fumes so it can be used indoors.

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